Organizational Agility

Tushar Paunikar: Agile and the KRA Conundrum

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Reblogged with permission from , the original author of
 this content, as a contributor to blogagility.com. Originally published 
on LinkedIn, November 22, 2016.

 

Life can be pulled by goals just as surely as it can be pushed by drives. -Viktor E. Frankl

Metrics drive behavior. I bet all would agree. We have experienced this umpteen times in our professional life. Even our personal life is abundant with examples where metrics influence people’s behavior.

If my kid has the target to score an ‘A’ in Math and that target is linked to a new bike, he will try to find insincere ways to achieve his target, if he sees his attempts to study sincerely may not be fruitful.

If a developer has the target to maintain 80% code coverage and that target is linked to a quarterly Most Valuable Player award, (s)he will try to find nasty ways to increase code coverage, if (s)he sees that all attempts to write meaningful unit tests may not meet the project deadline.

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Srinivas Garapati: The Agile, Framework, and the challenges.

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Reblogged with permission from Srinivas Garapati, the original author of this content, as a contributor to 
blogagility.com. Originally published on LinkedIn, June 28, 2017.

Introduction

Scrum and other agile frameworks may be easy to understand, yet prove extremely challenging to implement – especially in any large organizational environment. Why is that so? The following metaphor is an attempt to explain the difficulty. Every metaphor is imperfect, but we will try to give a gist of the challenges involved.

We apologize should anyone feel offended, and this is not to disparage the great work that everyone contributed to the agile movement. The knowledge and great learning that we have accumulated over the years would not have happened without this journey through the Agile manifesto.

What’s a framework?

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Michael Küsters: There are no true Scrum teams

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Reblogged with permission from , the original author of
 this content. Originally published on LinkedIn, August 5, 2017.

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This article is a discussion about what Scrum is – and what it isn’t. When discussing with zealous Scrum evangelists, the most common rhethoric is the “No true Scotsman” fallacy – otherwise known as “shifting goalposts”.

This is the classic “No true Scotsman” – as per Wikipedia:

Person A: “No Scotsman puts sugar on his porridge.”

Person B: “But my uncle Angus likes sugar with his porridge.”

Person A: “Ah yes, but no true Scotsman puts sugar on his porridge.” Read the rest of this entry »

Adrian Lander: The Agile Guru – Not!

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Reblogged with permission from Adrian Lander, the original author of
this content. Originally published on LinkedIn, August 6, 2017.

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The Agile Guru – Not!

I was in shock, the other day. Really.

Yes, me getting shocked, after so many years in practice, hardly a believable start of a real story.

But it really happened, in front of my eyes. And I was in shock, for just a bit.

It was a clear demonstration of some of what is so wrong with a common way of “implementing agile”.

I saw someone with the title of agile coach being called “Guru, sir”. By his student. And he did not change that. His Ego and Power ATM just opened up to accept the dollar notes.

I had to reach for the toilet (virtually). Read the rest of this entry »

SAFe© – The Program Dependency Board, a real life working example

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I promised a picture of the (jokingly) “super duper dependency board runway” (PDB) for our Agile Release Planes (ART) two weeks ago from my amazing uber client people at ESC. Well, here you go.

before the ART 1 and ART 3 PI4 Planning (P4 PIP):

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How to describe a Fractal in Agile

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A fractal is a mathematical set that exhibits a repeating pattern displayed at every scale.

Modularity and Fractal behaviors of scaling “Agile” frameworks. Do you see the consequential behavior of scaled Agile implementations as fractal patterns? Shouldn’t they be or are they?

Should a team’s relative estimating be fractal? performance in value and successful outcomes?

Any math nerds want to help out a coach? Does the analogy work?

Admittedly, I’m not smart enough to wrap my head around much more than simple addition and subtraction. I do see the similarities and I am always looking for better ways to describe what we teach. Thoughts?

Defining Velocity for relative estimating teams (Agile)

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Defining Velocity

Let’s define “velocity” in “Agile” (or should I say more accurately relative estimating teams?) terms before we get started so that we have a shared understanding of what the community and thought leaders have to say.

524px-Kinematics.svg Read the rest of this entry »