Category: Scrum

My practice advice to bring the Agile way of developing software to a team.

Authored by Aleksandr Kizhner, AgileThought, also a blogagility.com contributing author.

April 24, 2018

I strongly believe that every software development team is a very HIGH-IQ team, and we can’t just impose practices on them. They have to understand the WHY.  There is the book called “Start with Why” by Simon Sinek, and it talks about what’s foundational to motivate human behavior. We must start with “WHY are we doing this? ”

Continue reading “My practice advice to bring the Agile way of developing software to a team.”

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VersionOne 12th Annual State of Agile Report – Scaling Methods Growth Comparison

The newest VersionOne 12th Annual State of Agile Report was released on April 9, 2018. Last year I compared the growth of scaling frameworks and methods to each other year over year. (click here to see the report from last year) Continue reading “VersionOne 12th Annual State of Agile Report – Scaling Methods Growth Comparison”

The Agile End Game & the Agile Fallacy

March 28, 2018 - by Marshall Guillory

Agile is itself a fallacy

“We are ‘Agile’ because we were delivering ‘working software’ every two weeks”

But did we build the right thing? Do the right thing? Was it valuable?

Oops, we forgot to read the details… the values AND the principles are important. Is it a good thing they clarified the value in the #1 principle on the second page?

What about culture? Not so simple as four plus twelve equals Agile? Continue reading “The Agile End Game & the Agile Fallacy”

Agile Moment: Lego Serious play for SAFe® Teams Sim

During the Lego Serious play for SAFe® Teams Sim this week one of the teams decided they were a component team supporting the rest of the ART.

Do you think the experiment worked?

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Retrospectives @Scale within SAFe® portfolio context

Did you know that the value of facilitating retrospectives is also valuable at scale? In other words, facilitating cross-organizational retrospectives. Improvement is necessary to create better business outcomes. Relentless improvement should be a prime directive in every Lean-Agile organization.

In particular, if you are working within a Lean-Agile SAFe® portfolio you may be familiar with some of the following retrospectives. Others may not be so obvious. The point of which is that we should retro our performance for significant activities/ceremonies. When there are obvious bottlenecks in the system, do a retro, and use wisdom when this is not the case. And remember the easiest way to fail at a retrospective is to neglect to create improvement stories that make their way into the backlog. Continue reading “Retrospectives @Scale within SAFe® portfolio context”

Like a huddle in a football game, except a little bit longer than a huddle

Authored by Andrew Long, LitheSpeed, also a blogagility.com contributing author.

When teaching teams about Scrum and its design, there’s no better source than Jeff Sutherland himself. Here, in particular, is one video that I’ve used dozens of times:
Continue reading “Like a huddle in a football game, except a little bit longer than a huddle”

Product Owners are torn between being the “Leader-first” and the “Servant-first”

Authored by Preetam De, a blogagility.com contributing author.

When we talk about Servant Leadership the first role that comes to our mind is the Scrum Master. It is the first role ever, of its kind, which was created specifically for the sole purpose to “Serve”. Only if Robert K. Greenleaf was alive until 1998, he would be the happiest person to know that his whole life’s contribution has an effect on a dedicated leadership role; it changed everything especially the way we see management and leadership nowadays. Then we started seeing the rise of “Agile Coaches” which was created, I guess, to differentiate that servant leadership exists outside Scrum as well in an equally dedicated role.

Continue reading “Product Owners are torn between being the “Leader-first” and the “Servant-first””