Software Development

How Do Committees Invent? /Conway’s Law

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Have you ever worked in an organization run by committee? All decisions requiring consensus, even the minutiae? Immutable command and control structures that were often too busy to collaborate with underlings? What did their results look like? I like how Mel ties in the social construct and communication into the discussion of organizational structures. How we work together is important, just like what we are working on.

To the extent that an organization is not completely flexible in
its communication structure, that organization will stamp out
an image of itself in every design it produces.
… Because the design that occurs first is almost never the best
possible, the prevailing system concept [the design] may need to
change. Therefore, flexibility of organization is important to
effective design. Ways must be found to reward design managers
for keeping their organizations lean and flexible.

-M. Conway

http://www.melconway.com/Home/Conways_Law.html

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SAFe VelociPacity Tool

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velocipacitytooliterationpanel
Iteration Panel

Coaches and Practitioners of Lean-Agile and the SAFe

In my experience the amount of time that we get to spend in Lean-Agile and SAFe courses on the subject of Velocity and Capacity Planning is inadequate. So I spent some time building a tool for one of my client organizations. I have since spent some time greatly enhancing the tool and getting it ready for distribution. I am offering the tool for free. All that I ask is if you decide that the tool has value and you are going to use it, to like my blog. Perhaps even share this article on your favorite social media.  Read the rest of this entry »

Essential SAFe and the Agile End Game

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essential-safebigpicture
Essential SAFe 4.0, Scaled Agile, Inc.

The good folks at Scaled Agile, the SAFe® community, Agile agnostics, consultants, and some in the “Agile” community are onto something incredibly important in defining the elusive and dynamic Agile End Game for organizations. Read the rest of this entry »

The Cynefin Framework reference

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Sketch of the Cynefin framework, by Edwin Stoop

I can’t say that I agree at all with Dave Snowden’s approach to communication. The guy is rough around the edges, a “perpetual curmudgeon” in his own words. And that is describing it kindly. He does have some good ideas on decision making though. Read the rest of this entry »

Lippitt/Knoster Change Model – useful dive into change theory

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Studying up on Lippitt / Knoster change models I learned about from Construx videos. Steve McConnell of course being one of the greatest software development thought leaders is the presenter. Interesting how these change theories are baked into some of the Agile frameworks and mindsets like the SAFe / Agile Manifesto. As a coach, these are useful strategies on how to build our approach to managing change (like fear, unknowns, budgeting/money, et cetera).

Get a Grip on Managing Change – Michael Nanfito

Agile Transformations – Change Model – Construx

Agile Moment: Serial vs. Parallel delivery

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Explain this sticky.#agilemoment #SAFe


Under which type of delivery model will the customer receive more value?

AGILE MOMENT: Framing a User Story, a Visualization.

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framingauserstoryblogagilityWhat does it mean to frame a user story? This often can be a difficult process to explain. Try to use this technique when you are teaching planning poker and writing user stories.

As we work through the process of doing planning poker to create amazing estimates (based on: knowledge, uncertainty, volume, and complexity) we learn more about the quality of the user story being presented. Newly formed teams (forming, storming) often find that their stories can be difficult to describe and gain consensus (on the estimate) and shared understanding. As a coach this is when I walk to the board and draw the infamous U.A.B. (unknown amorphous blob). Watch the video for the description of the technique.YMMV, but I find it useful for describing part of the intent behind user story telling. Learn more here.