#agile

Extremists and the hate SAFe machine

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https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6532627335068299264

September 2019 trolls update

It seems that hate and jealously knows no bounds with some people. They simply cannot practice what they preach and be respectful, therefore diminishing any rational argument they would make. Here are a few new in the cast of characters that troll the SAFe with misrepresentations and outright hateful comments.

This was a random post from Alex.
Murali responds with this comment to a post from Scaled Agile at the SAFe Summit.
https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6585263102634311680?commentUrn=urn%3Ali%3Acomment%3A%28activity%3A6585263102634311680%2C6585372081599377408%29

The problem with trolls

I updated the title of the article. I have observed a pattern over the past year or so of Scrum Alliance aligned folks like Certified Scrum Trainers (CST) and other certified Scrum folks writing articles and posts of varying degrees of criticism from valid debates over ideas (rare) to mostly disparaging misrepresentations, to openly hostile, to outright extremist comments like the picture above. I changed the article title to properly address not all CST’s. The original title was meant to address the pattern observed by many people in the industry of several unnamed CST’s making hateful comments about SAFe and the people behind the SAFe.

Remember, hate comes in many forms. All of it is bad, and unacceptable. I’ve lost count of the number of people that I have known, loved, and like that have died or suffered from cancer (and parasites). Attributing those words to the good people behind the SAFe is absolutely abhorrent, evil behavior. The picture above is just the latest attack. So, I apologize for the original generalization.

There are also two parts to this article. The first part addresses the hateful opening comment from Alexey. The second challenges the misrepresentations of the SAFe. These are separate discussions. Debating ideas is necessary. We should not ever accept hateful words or behavior.

Why bother?

Let me start by explaining why I even bother debating with hateful people in the first place. Because we must confront evil in the world. Yes, at its root this is evil, misguided behavior. If we want to move ideas forward to innovation they must be challenged in a respectful, professional manner.

Anyone that starts out a conversation by saying you or your thing is a “cancer and parasite” isn’t actually looking for conversation. They are being hateful and are probably ignorant on the topic of debate. If this were a political topic then perhaps the bad behavior could be expected because it has been normalized for millennia. Does it make it right? Emphatically, no.

I find it disturbing that extremists and their ilk who are supposedly exemplars for the Agile Manifesto and values of Scrum openly display behavior that is antithetical to the Agile Manifesto and Scrum. After all, “RESPECT” is a value of Scrum. And the manifesto has a clear purpose, “We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it.

Read the rest of this entry »
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When Scrum and Agile are not enough

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One of the more common anti-patterns of Agile adoption is the misconception that simply following methods such as Scrum will lead to development becoming ‘Agile.'”

© Scaled Agile, Inc.


I couldn’t agree more. In nearly every case over my 20+ year career that I’ve been invited to help scale business agility, “to become Agile – in behavior and nature”, in an enterprise the organization was already struggling with achieving agility using just Scrum and Agile. This is the basis of my often repeated statement, “Agile is dead.”

To my dismay, it is also common for the great technical and business practices and concepts from XP to not exist in the lexicon of the organization. Or, only part of XP is used, often incorrectly. It is shameful that Kent Beck’s work is not more prominent in the space. I’m glad to see that he is becoming more active again recently.

A better coaching approach (than simply proposing Scrum and Agile in a CAS) is to understand the market of tools, best practices, frameworks, et cetera and how to apply them appropriately without bias to customer context to drive better outcomes for the business or organization.

As a continuous learner, this is also why I have so much respect Alex Yakyma’s work with OrgMindset. Thinking tools are needed to properly apply and use complex tools in complex organizations.  Alex said something very important and interesting during our last discussion/debate about the topics of “Agile” tools and frameworks. Paraphrasing, he said, “I’m just using everything that I know and all of my skills and experience to help businesses make more money.”

This statement is important because often Agile zealots lose sight of the purpose of business – to create wealth – for the shareholders or beneficiaries of the organization. Agile and Scrum are not the goal.

Furthermore, we often forget that Agile and Scrum start out in a state of death. Agile and Scrum are literally just words on a page. They must be given life.

#scaledagile #scrum #agile #scaledagileframework #business #safe

Welcome to the Scream Guide

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Scream Guide Google Link

check out this awesome book of anti patterns.

Feature Progress Chart Template

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If you are a change agent, SAFe® Program Consultant, SAFe® Product Manager, STE, RTE, or practitioner you may find the Blogagility.com™ Feature Progress Chart Template a useful tool for kick-starting your product management (PM) implementation and Lean-Agile reporting.  Read the rest of this entry »

Learning how to Scrum master in SAFe

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Awesome experience with a great group of students eager to learn about Scrum mastering within a SAFe portfolio. I really love teaching this course. 28 folks were in the class and thirteen agreed to take the picture to be posted here on LI. Thank you, team! My co-instructor, Giuseppe B. (left), was also amazing, as usual, as expected for such a great guy! The team chose (self-managed) to use the “Build a house” simulation rather than stock context sim so it was great fun to learn about and experience the awesomeness of PI Planning and the enterprise backlog model while planning a $1.5M mansion.

The teams also experienced self-organization and self-management in this course as they aligned to a common mission, vision, and strategy for their “construction company ART.” They learned how to write and decompose great features and stories.

The students also get near constant teaching and reference back to the value systems of the Agile Manifesto, SAFe, Scrum, Lean, and Systems Thinking. We spend lots of time talking about cognitive empathy, Human Factors, CAS, and culture transformation using the AM goal of “We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it” as a foundation.

#SAFe #Scrum #Scrummaster

SSM2018SEP6_Guillory

 

Lean-Agile Team Metrics Starter Kit

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The fourth tool created to date by blogagility.com for the community!

This handy starter kit is for Scrum masters that are using the Shu Ha Ri paradigm for team development. Good coaches help new teams avoid the pitfalls of added complexity involved in “Agile Lifecycle Management Tools” and instead push for good old-fashioned manual BVIR’s, Kanbans, Scrum boards, et cetera. Change is hard enough in a CAS without adding to the problem by also complicating the way of working. Read the rest of this entry »

Michael Küsters : Things that never meant what we understood

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Reblogged with permission from , the original author of
 this content. Originally published on his blog Fail Fast, Move On, June 2, 2018.

We throw around a lot of terminology – yet we may not even know what we’re saying. Here are three terms that you may have understood differently from how the original author’s intention:

1. Technical debt

Technical debt has been used by many to denote willfully taken shortcuts on quality.
Many developers use the term to imply that code has been developed with poor craftsmanship – for instance, lack of tests or overly complicated structure. Read the rest of this entry »