Quotes

AI | Wyze

Person detection on a $20 camera! WOW! And they managed to add a complete AI model on existing devices—-for free!

 

Source: AI | Wyze

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Raconteur – Cognitive Bias

This infographic from Raconteur is a good summary of cognitive biases. People and hence, organizations bring their bias to work each day. How we as change agents maneuver to help build environments where those people can generate successful outcomes is important. The first step is in understanding behavior and how it is driven by our biases. I find this extremely interesting as I was a psych major for a semester. I also have a very dear friend who is a Forensic Psychologist, Dr. Shawn Roberson, whom I enjoy discussing this “Agile” thing with on occasion. There is much in the field that directly affects our skills as coaches to successfully help people transform.

Ngobi, E. (2018, January 31). Cognitive bias. Retrieved March 26, 2018, from https://www.raconteur.net/infographics/cognitive-bias

OrgMindset: Fixed or Variable? It’s Actually Both!

By  | February 21, 2018

Should my team structure be fixed or variable? Should my funding be fixed or variable? Should the plan reflect fixed expectations or variable possibilities?

The reality is, it’s neither one of those isolated notions, but rather both of them enabling organization’s performance in concert with each other.

On the one hand, enterprise reality contains inherent uncertainty and variability. External conditions change, internal factors evolve and, even more importantly, we are able to refine our understanding of those only over time. It is fundamentally irrational to attempt building organizational plans and structures that contain “all the answers” inside.

Read the rest of the article at Orgmindset.com.

 

 

WSJ: What My Son With Autism Taught Me About Managing People

Cognitive wiring
Individuals in the workplace have their own distinctive cognitive wiring that shapes how they approach the world. ILLUSTRATION: JOHN HERSEY FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

I like to think I was a considerate colleague when I worked in an office. I paid attention to cultural and gender differences. I made an effort to run inclusive meetings and write inclusive articles.

But for all my attention to diversity, I didn’t pay attention to one crucial form of difference: the way people think.

Continue reading “WSJ: What My Son With Autism Taught Me About Managing People”