Month: January 2019

Agile Moment: I’m not impressed by your tools

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A thought from a thread that Al S. started.

A craftsman knows how to use the right tool applied to the appropriate task. My grandfather was a master carpenter. He built hundreds of homes and also furniture and renovations. He possessed a garage full of all kinds of tools and hardware. Even many of a class of tools. Different types of hammers and saws and glue and nails and screws. His customers did not purchase his garage nor his tools. They were buying a finished product. A house. A table. A newly remodeled bathroom or kitchen. The product of, the intersection of the craftsman and tools, is where the value is captured and delivered.

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Learn how to install an innovation and learning rocket engine

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Step by step instructions! ūüôā

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13th Annual State of Agile Report – LeSS is less.

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The newest VersionOne (13th) Annual State of Agile Report was recently released. Last year the report was published on April 9, 2018. This year the report was published on May 7, 2019. As I had reported earlier I will compare and contrast the various scaling frameworks growth and shrinkage and also discuss the missing elements for organizational transformation and whether or not the industry at large is addressing those challenges.

The newest VersionOne 13th Annual State of Agile Report was released on May 7, 2019. Over the past few years I have been comparing interesting trends in the State of Agile Report where I have compared the growth of scaling frameworks and methods to each other year over year.

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Perception of Value in a CAS

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It has been said that “Value is in the eye of the beholder.” Our perceptions drive our understanding of value, according to psychologists, and perhaps marketers. What makes great marketing at a company and positive sales can also have a negative effect on the product development organization itself. A double-edged sword of sorts, as humans and our perceptions, assumptions, and emotions travel with us to work. Long after that impulse purchase of the latest iPhone or other gadgets we are still creatures of habit.

The same behaviors that make us vulnerable to marketing manipulation also make product development companies vulnerable to diminished truth and performance in execution. The reality is that we are navigating complex adaptive systems (CAS) within systems. The system (organization) we work within, the product (a system), our team (a system), and ourselves (a system). The causes and effects of movement or change in and around the systems are where we must build discipline, manage assumptions, and rationalize, validate (/in-) through experiments. These validations become part of our imprint, our perceptions, or mental models (schemas). But what if our rationalization or validation was incorrect? Our experiment flawed. How would you know?

This is an organizational aspect too. The organization is the symbiosis of its people and their behavior and mental models.

For example, what is the value of a spare tire when you are purchasing a new car?iu

Does the spare tire affect the decision-making process of buying the car? What about the price of an average spare tire ($30-$100) and its effect on the decision-making process to buy a car? Read the rest of this entry »