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What is organizational agility?

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Enjoying the questionnaire Nissreen Barakat. I have pondered this question for a while too. I don’t feel like the answers I’ve found so far tell the whole story, although most are decent. What are your thoughts?

From your point of view, what is the definition of organizational agility?

My take at starting the discussion:

An internalization [permanent] of the capacity of an organization to consume simple, complex and/or complicated problems quickly without requiring a formal reconfiguration or restructuring (adaptability) of the organization’s internal structure while being able to deliver on the mission and value delivery in a way that customers of the organization would consider successful outcomes. Measurable organizational agility would be reflected as a learning culture focused on relentless improvement with no regret failure. “Pivoting without mercy or guilt” as Leffingwell and Knaster would say. Learning cultures in organizations should also be able to consume chaotic problems by bringing order to the chaos through iterative experimentation and study of outcomes and generation of new hypothesis. Also, organizational “agility” is possible without “Agile.”

#SAFe #Agile #agility #organizationalagility #howto #whatnext

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SAFe VelociPacity Tool

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Iteration Panel

Coaches and Practitioners of Lean-Agile and the SAFe

In my experience the amount of time that we get to spend in Lean-Agile and SAFe courses on the subject of Velocity and Capacity Planning is inadequate. So I spent some time building a tool for one of my client organizations. I have since spent some time greatly enhancing the tool and getting it ready for distribution. I am offering the tool for free. All that I ask is if you decide that the tool has value and you are going to use it, to like my blog and share feedback for improvement. Perhaps even share this article on your favorite social media.  Read the rest of this entry »

AGILE MOMENT: Framing a User Story, a Visualization.

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framingauserstoryblogagilityWhat does it mean to frame a user story? This often can be a difficult process to explain. Try to use this technique when you are teaching planning poker and writing user stories.

As we work through the process of doing planning poker to create amazing estimates (based on: knowledge, uncertainty, volume, and complexity) we learn more about the quality of the user story being presented. Newly formed teams (forming, storming) often find that their stories can be difficult to describe and gain consensus (on the estimate) and shared understanding. As a coach this is when I walk to the board and draw the infamous U.A.B. (unknown amorphous blob). Watch the video for the description of the technique.YMMV, but I find it useful for describing part of the intent behind user story telling. Learn more here.

Agile Moment: How to estimate Story Points using Planning Poker

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(see also: Agile Moment: Equating Story Points to TimeScrum Effort Estimation, Practical Guide Story Points Estimation, How Story Points relate to hours, Story Points vs. Task Hours, Planning Poker)

Overview

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Estimating story points for user stories that implement features on the Scrum teams product roadmap / product backlog is a critical planning exercise. All Scrum teams should utilize planning methods to estimate engineering efforts for future work. There are many possible methods available to estimate effort. However, for teams that are using Agile frameworks like Scrum, a proven, highly effective method of choice is Planning Poker. The overall goal of planning poker is to establish a clear consensus on an estimate for a given scope of work or user story.

Normalization of a relative estimating technique is absolutely critical for a team to reach a high-performance state. This also directly impacts an organization’s ability to perform capacity planning and management in scaled Agile applications.

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