Project Management

The thought leaders that lost their way

Posted on Updated on

Kent Beck – “This Agile thing should be about the need to heal the divide between business and development.”

And here we are in 2017 with scaling framework zealots launching rockets and starting wars bashing other frameworks? Doing exactly what Mr. Beck’s vision was against. Not debating ideas in the marketplace respectfully. Outright disrespectfully bashing and promoting misinformation campaigns.

WHY? Have you lost your way illustrious thought leaders? Aren’t we supposed to be better than this as change agents for good? What happened to healing the divide between business and developers?

Why are you creating divisions in this fledgling “Agile” revolution? For money? Fame?

This is not “Agile” behaviour.

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

The Agile End Game 

Aside Posted on Updated on

And the Agile Game of Thrones continues, a self-defining and destructive process where no people or processes or frameworks win. Everyone loses. The Agile End Game.

Next time can we do it TOGETHER?

Or, perhaps we should work on common ground now to defeat the enemies that so called “Agilists” claim to challenge?

Truths about the SAFe

Posted on Updated on

mikebeedleagilemanifesto

S_Fe is not Agile. S_Fe is not even Scrum. – Mike Beedle

In response to Mike Beedle on LinkedIn. Mike is wrong about the SAFe of course. And not just because of his childish method of attack. Facts, evidence, experiments, my experience and dozens of business case studies back up the experiments of the SAFe. Mike sounds a lot like project managers that swear the PMBoK/waterfall works better than agile for large scale “projects” with high complexity, significant uncertainty, many dependencies and new knowledge to be obtained to deliver the product. Project management works in those scenarios (fantasy). But not as well as Agile (reality). Read the studies (Chaos Report, Standish Group; State of Agile, VersionOne; others). A sea change is in play — right now. Customers want predictability, results — and truth. Not endless “Change Requests” and contract modifications for more time, more money and more people. One truth about the Agile Manifesto is that it is great guidance as a value system and principles for software development. The big problem is that it [Agile Manifesto] is STATIC. Relentless improvement drives us to go beyond yesterday. Study the Scaled Agile Framework for the enterprise and come to your own conclusions. Evolve or join the museum with the other artifacts of the information age.

Responses below.

Read the rest of this entry »

Lippitt/Knoster Change Model – useful dive into change theory

Posted on Updated on

Studying up on Lippitt / Knoster change models I learned about from Construx videos. Steve McConnell of course being one of the greatest software development thought leaders is the presenter. Interesting how these change theories are baked into some of the Agile frameworks and mindsets like the SAFe / Agile Manifesto. As a coach, these are useful strategies on how to build our approach to managing change (like fear, unknowns, budgeting/money, et cetera).

Get a Grip on Managing Change – Michael Nanfito

Agile Transformations – Change Model – Construx

Andy Hunt: The Failure of Agile

Posted on Updated on

Wow! What an amazing take on the state of agile. This article really hits home on a point of failure in many agile implementations at the macro level. I highly suggest reading these words from Andy Hunt. Read the rest of this entry »

AGILE MOMENT: Agile Transformations and ROI

Posted on Updated on

Agile Transformations and ROI

This question was asked recently on a social network Scrum group. I thought that it was very relevant and also a common request from executives that desire an evaluation of ROI for agile transformations. However, it is important to consider both efficiency and the effectiveness of your agile transformation. Read the rest of this entry »

AGILE MOMENT: What are themes, epics, and user stories in Scrum?

Posted on Updated on

An epic in Scrum terminology is a group of related user stories or may appear as a “big” story. Epics generally cover an entire use case or work flow for a feature related to user interaction with a system in software development. Epics are completed when all the associated stories implementing the epic are done-done. While stories may be completed and delivered independently, epics are only complete when all stories are verified done.

Read the rest of this entry »